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Authentic Korean beef short ribs recipe

Authentic Korean beef short ribs recipe

  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Meat and poultry
  • Beef
  • Cuts of beef

Flavourful beef ribs are marinated overnight before being placed on the barbecue until juicy and tender. Enjoy this Korean favourite with a salad or some veggies on the side.

2 people made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 1.8kg beef short ribs
  • 120ml low salt soy sauce
  • 100g caster sugar
  • 30g runny honey
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon ground black pepper
  • 45ml water
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
  • 20ml Asian plum wine

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:15min ›Extra time:1day marinating › Ready in:1day30min

  1. Whisk together the soya sauce, sugar, honey, garlic, pepper, water, sesame oil, and plum wine until the sugar has dissolved; pour the mixture into a large reclosable food and freezer bag. Place the ribs into the marinade, squeeze all the air out of the bag, seal, and chill in the fridge for at least 24 hours (place inside a dish to avoid any small leaks).
  2. The next day, remove the ribs from the fridge and allow to come to room temperature before cooking. Remove the ribs from the marinade and discard the marinade.
  3. Preheat the BBQ to a medium-high heat and lightly oil the grill grate. Cook the ribs on the BBQ until browned and no longer pink in the centre, 4 to 6 minutes per side.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(16)

Reviews in English (14)

by Shans

Yum! Rich and delicious flavour. Now I don't really have the right to rate this recipe as is because I didn't make it as is. How I altered it did work. Sometime I will try it as the original indicates, today just didn't have enough time. Here's what I did: 1/4 cup soy sauce instead of 1/2 cup 1/4 cup white sugar instead of 1/2 cup 11/2 tb red wine instead of Asian plum wine (I didn't have any!) Instead of marinating the beef I browned it in a non-stick frying pan and tossed it into my slow-cooker. I added the marinating ingredients to the hot frying pan and let it come to a boil to collect the drippings from the beef, let's face it, it's yummy even though also naughty! Then with everything in the slow-cooker, turned it on low for 6 hours and it was nice.-05 Nov 2009

by cookiebookie

These were phenomenal! I had never made beef ribs before, so I was a little wary. I doubled the sauce but omitted the sugar. I added a bit more honey to make up for it. The sauce was super tasty! I kept sampling it prior to adding the ribs. I didn't have time to marinade well, so I put it all in my cast iron dutch oven and put it in the oven at 250 for about 2 hours. The meat was falling off the bone, super tender! I wish I had the grill ready, I bet it would have been even yummier to finish it off on a hot grill to carmelize it a bit and burn off a teensy bit of the oil. Definitely a keeper! I never knew I could make Korean ribs! I was sure I was going to regret opening the bottle of plum wine a friend gave me... but no regrets at all!-23 May 2010

by Scuba_Steve

Fantastic! I made these for a party and everyone went crazy over them. I should have made more. The only change I made was that I only had about 8 hours to marinade them and I added about 1-1/2 Tbsp of red pepper flakes, but this is so tasty I wouldn't miss it if I had left that out. Next time I'll do the whole 24 hours and I'll double the recipe.-31 May 2010


Galbi, Traditional Recipe (Wang-Galbi), Korean BBQ, Marinated Short Ribs

Galbi, also known as Korean BBQ, is my first choice of dish when I have an important guest over. It never fails to impress. This Galbi recipe reflects the traditional or classic style commonly seen at specialized Korean BBQ restaurants in Korea. The cut of beef used in this recipe is called Wang-Galbi, which means "King-Rib". Although the wang-galbi cut is the best in taste and presentation, you can use LA Galbi or other tender steak cuts if you wish. Also, the same marinade can be used to make delicious tofu or mushrooms steaks.

You can enjoy galbi simply with a bowl of rice and a salad of your choice. However, traditional galbi dinner includes rice, doenjang Jjigae (soy bean paste stew), kimchi and a few side dishes. Also, Koreans enjoy making "ssam" (wrap) when eating galbi or other meat. To make ssam, place a leaf of red leaf lettuce on your palm, layer it with a perilla leaf (optional), place meat and a dab of ssamjang (dipping sauce). You can also add sliced garlic and sliced green chili peppers. Then, close the lettuce and enjoy the eruption of heavenly flavors in your mouth.

Buy Galbi ingredients online here.

Galbi, also known as Korean BBQ, is my first choice of dish when I have an important guest over. It never fails to impress. This Galbi recipe reflects the traditional or classic style commonly seen at specialized Korean BBQ restaurants in Korea. The cut of beef used in this recipe is called Wang-Galbi, which means "King-Rib". Although the wang-galbi cut is the best in taste and presentation, you can use LA Galbi or other tender steak cuts if you wish. Also, the same marinade can be used to make delicious tofu or mushrooms steaks.

You can enjoy galbi simply with a bowl of rice and a salad of your choice. However, traditional galbi dinner includes rice, doenjang Jjigae (soy bean paste stew), kimchi and a few side dishes. Also, Koreans enjoy making "ssam" (wrap) when eating galbi or other meat. To make ssam, place a leaf of red leaf lettuce on your palm, layer it with a perilla leaf (optional), place meat and a dab of ssamjang (dipping sauce). You can also add sliced garlic and sliced green chili peppers. Then, close the lettuce and enjoy the eruption of heavenly flavors in your mouth.

Buy Galbi ingredients online here.


Korean BBQ Marinated Beef Short Ribs

Korean barbecue is one of the first things that come to mind when people think of Korean food. And it’s world famous for good reason! I love that it’s as much of a social event as it is an eating one, enjoyed by groups huddled around a table embedded with a grill sizzling with marinated meats, seafood and vegetables.

Interactive food, I call it. And I’m 100% on board!

Of all the marinated barbecued meats, I am pretty sure that Korean Short Ribs is one of the most well known. Koreans prize this cut for its rich beefy flavour, while the addition of the marinade tenderises, flavours and encourages delicious caramelisation on the meat as it barbecues.

Korean Short Ribs are also notable for the unique way they are cut: The meat is “unrolled” to form a long, thin flap still attached to the bone. This not only ensures maximum marinade penetration but also that the meat cooks quickly, while making it easier to eat.

Like I said, Koreans have their barbecue game all figured out!

  • Korean Barbecue Marinade for Beef Short Ribs
  • Beef short ribs marinating

Parboil your ribs for about 10 minutes in boiling water. It will help get rid of any impurities and tiny particles from the bones. Parboiling will also remove some extra fat.

Puree the sauce ingredients onion, pear, kiwi, garlic, soy sauce, dark brown sugar, rice wine, with a little bit of sea kelp stock. It’s easy and quick to prepare.

This is an optional step but recommended. Round the cut edges and corners of carrot and radish pieces with a small paring knife to smooth out.

When vegetables are simmered and braised for a period of time, those edges and corners breaks off easily. Rounding will prevent that and help the sauce to be cleaner.


How to make Korean braised short ribs

In contrast to the braising method typical of Western cooking, Koreans traditionally do not sear the meat before braising them.

Instead, the ribs are first parboiled in water with some aromatic vegetables before being braised in sweet and savory braising liquid. Parboiling is a technique used to remove excess fat and blood from the ribs. I boil the ribs in a small amount of water and use the resulting stock in the braising liquid after removing the fat.

Searing, however, is commonly done in modern Korean cooking. If preferred, feel free to sear the ribs to add that rich browned meat flavor. I do it sometimes as well. The results are equally delicious in slightly different ways.

To prevent the vegetables from turning too soggy, I braise the ribs first, and then add the vegetables about halfway through.

Chestnuts, jujubes, pine nuts, and gingko nuts are customary garnishes that make this dish look very elegant, but the ribs will still be delicious without them if they are unavailable.

These succulent ribs, in a rich sauce, will be perfect for any of your special occasions! Then again, why wait for a special occasion to make this tasty comfort food?


Marinate the short ribs

  • In a large bowl, combine the sugar, soy sauce, apple juice, sesame oil, garlic, and ginger with a pinch of salt and pepper. Add the short ribs and, using your hands, massage the marinade into the meat. Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 and up to 12 hours.

Grill the short ribs

  • Prepare a hot (450°F) charcoal or gas grill fire. Clean and lightly oil the grill grate.
  • Remove the short ribs from the marinade and let any excess drip off discard the marinade. Grill the short ribs, flipping once, until done to your liking, about 4 minutes total for medium rare. Transfer to a serving platter.

To serve

  • Garnish the meat with the scallions, chile threads, and sesame seeds. Serve with the lettuce, rice, and Ssamjang, cutting the bones from the meat with kitchen shears before eating.
  • To eat, put a small spoonful of rice inside a lettuce leaf, dab it with some sauce, and top with a piece of the beef. Wrap and eat.

Recipe Notes

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Ingredient Spotlight


Korean Barbecue Short Ribs (LA Galbi) Recipe

Ingredients

  • 3 lb thin (Laterally) cut beef short ribs
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 6 tbsp brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup mirin
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 2 cups Asian pear (or Bosc pear), diced
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 6 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 tsp fresh ginger, minced

For the Ssamjang:

  • 1/2 cup gochujang
  • 2 tbsp doenjang
  • 1/4 cup green onions, green parts only, minced
  • 1 serrano pepper, stemmed, minced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp mirin
  • 1 tbsp Reida Honey Farm Wildflower Honey
  • 1 tbsp sesame seeds
  • water, as needed

Instructions

To make the Ssamjang, mix all ingredients. Thin with water to desired consistency.

To make the marinade, whisk together the soy sauce, water, brown sugar, mirin, and black pepper in a large bowl. Set aside.

Combine the Asian pear, onion, garlic, sesame oil and ginger in Vitamix Blender. Blend until smooth.

Add the pear mixture to the soy sauce base and whisk to combine.

Submerge the short ribs in the pear marinade. Marinate under refrigeration for at least 4 hours, up to overnight.

Build a hot coal bed in your Kamado Joe Classic II, and set the grill up for direct grilling with the grates positioned in the lower setting (closest to the coals).

Remove the ribs from the marinade and wipe excess marinade from the surface. Grill on both sides until charred and tender.


Smoked Beef Short Ribs Recipe (Korean Kalbi Style)

One of my son’s favorite things to order when we are out is Korean Short Ribs, Kalbi. When my husband and I saw the ribs at Costco, we couldn’t resist. So here’s my smoked version of this traditional Korean dish.

I’ve made Kalbi once before, but it was a little different since I made them inside and turned them into a sandwich. This is closer to traditional Kabli. When looking up the recipe online, I compared my previous recipe and recipes I’ve found online. The one thing I found was that most of the recipes use Asian pears. How often do you have asian pears sitting around?

So, no asian pears for me, but I did have mango chunks in the freezer. So, viola! that’s what I used (oh and it worked on my earlier recipe as well). I didn’t use as much as before so the mango flavor really wasn’t too strong.

Next, a lot of the recipes called for a lemon-lime soda. Well, again, did I have that? Nope! But my husband had just made some Lemonade. What do you think I did? Yep, I used the lemonade.

Ok, so as you an see, I am a bundle of substitutions. Still was amazing and flavorful and so tender.

I hope you try it. You don’t have to use the smoker. You can grill or use the oven (roast or broil). If you use a grill, you will want to have a watchful eye as they will flare up due to the sugars and fat.


Korean Short Ribs Recipe Kalbi Beef

Considering how much Korean food I ate as a small child, it’s surprising that I don’t have more Korean recipes on the website yet (time to get on that!). We lived in Korea for a few years, from when I was in preschool until the first grade. Although we lived on base, my mother and her Korean friend would quite often take me along on their shopping trips to Itaewon. While all the different shops were fun, my favorite thing about Itaewon was the rows of food vendors lined up on the sidewalks. I could never resist the smell of yaki mandu (which still has a Pavlovian effect on me to this day!) and other Korean staples.

Although I didn’t understand it, I quickly learned that I had a bit of a magic touch when it came to the vendors in Korea.

All I had to do was smile sweetly at the vendor, give a little toss of my platinum curls, and say hello by shouting out “Anyong haseyo!” The Korean women would clap their hands with delight and nearly fall over each other to offer me whatever they had just made. The men would grin and pinch my cheeks, offering me a juicy Asian pear, or even dolls, bells and dresses! Always grateful, I’d clap my hands on to cheeks in joy, take their proffered gifts and offer a “Gamsa hamnida” (which means thank you). I still have a boxful of Korean dolls, each of which holds a special memory.

One of the most common offerings of food was Galbi beef, a Korean barbeque short rib. I absolutely loved Galbi because there was something that felt so right about holding a piece of beef in my little hand and gnawing the meat off of tiny bones. Every time I eat it I still feel like a preschooler who’s just been given a special gift from a stranger.

When I moved to Hawaii right before Middle School, I was delighted that Galbi was still so abundantly available, only it was called Kalbi Ribs instead. All the little old Korean ladies at my church loved to bring the tasty ribs to potlucks, and they were at pretty much every holiday gathering I went to.

Eager to learn the secret to the perfect kalbi beef ribs recipe, I began asking questions and joining the older women in the kitchen at various events. They taught me that the key to a good marinade for kalbi ribs is a balance of flavors, both sweet and savory. Traditionally, honey or sugar was used for sweetening the marinade. But all the Korean women I knew agreed that the best ingredient to use now, is a citrus soda like 7-UP, Sprite or Squirt. They say that not only is it sweet, but the carbonation and citrus also help to tenderize the meat.

I remember watching the wives of vendors in Korea grating Asian pears, at a lot of the food booths. When I asked the Korean women I know about the Asian pear, they agreed that you need to grate both Asian pear and onion into your kalbi marinade, which imparts more flavor than simply chopping them. Some of the women in Hawaii that I talked to make their Galbi incredibly sweet with soda, Asian pear and sugar in the marinade. I think that has been a bit westernized because I don’t remember the Galbi in Korea being nearly as sweet, so I leave the extra sugar out of my Korean beef recipe.

Now, two important keys to making kalbi ribs are to make sure you buy Korean style short ribs, and to soak them before marinating. The Korean style ribs are cut perpendicular to the bone, so you end up with an 6-10 inch strip of meat and three small bone segments attached. You can definitely find them at any Asian grocery store, but they’re often at local grocers and butchers as well. When we buy our next cow, I plan to ask for this as our rib cut. Now, because the bones are cut during the slicing process, there is a lot of bone dust on the ribs. Soaking them before marinating makes sure this dust is rinsed away and helps with the texture of the meat.

Although the ribs are best on the grill, you can also cook them indoors. Using an indoor grill press they need to cook about 6 minutes, or you can cook them in a large skillet on very high heat for 3-5 minutes each side.

If you were to order these Korean short ribs in a restaurant, especially a Hawaiian restaurant, you’ll usually get the entire strip of beef with three bones attached. When I serve the ribs, I usually use scissors after cooking them to cut them into three separate pieces. While our Chinese students have no trouble chewing around the bones, most Americans tend to find it difficult, so one bone per piece makes it easier to handle.

But the real reason I cut them is that it helps stretch my meat and save me money! I find that if I leave it in the long strips, people usually take two, which is six of the smaller pieces. But if I cut them, people usually take no more than four. Great technique for a party or potluck!

Are there any Korean food recipes you’d like to see on Eating Richly soon?


Galbi Jjim (Best Korean Braised Short Ribs)

This is Korean food at its best. Galbi jjim(갈비찜) /Kalbijjim was certainly one of my favorites as a kid and is still very much at the top of my list to this day. As a kid, I loved to eat just Galbi jjim, rice and Kimchi. It was a perfect balance of flavors for me. The combination of sweet yet savory, juicy yet melt in your mouth tender beef ribs with a great depth of flavor and the crunchy, spicy cabbage Kimchi to break up that little hint of fat was simply just too delicious for my figure. haha.. Even when all the ribs were gone, I savored every last drop of the remaining Galbi jjim sauce by mixing rice and the sauce together.

Koreans traditionally make this dish for great holiday occasions such as New Year’s and also for their most honored guests. So if you have visited many different relatives homes during the New Year’s, you do kind of get sick of it towards the end. Sadly, very few Korean restaurants (both abroad and in Korea) serve this dish anymore so you may not have been able to taste this at all. If you like Korean BBQs like bulgogi or kalbi, then you must try making this dish.

Kalbijjim is also a great party dish because you can make ahead of time. You just reheat when guests arrive. Kalbijjim, rice, kimchi, lettuce salad and any kind of jeon makes a fabulous party menu anytime.

Among the various beef cuts, Korean beef ribs are perhaps the most expensive cut and is certainly not something average Koreans eat or make often. When I went shopping to buy beef ribs (갈비 Kalbi) from our neighborhood market, I was told that it’s not a beef cut they normally carry because it’s so expensive. The butcher told me to come back during New Year’s or Chuseok holiday.

** Cool Galbi jjim overnight for best results.

Have an Instant POT? CLICK HERE for my IP recipe

Galbi Jjim (갈비찜) – Korean Braised Short Ribs

Servings 6 Time: Prep 15 min + Cook 2 hrs Difficulty: Moderate

Ingredients

  • 4 lbs (1.8kg) beef short ribs (갈비)
  • 5

Ingredients for Galbi jjim sauce

  • 3/4 C + 3 T (add later after tasting) dark soy sauce
  • 1/2 C sugar
  • 1/2 C mirin or sake
  • 2 T honey (+ 1 tsp as a finish)
  • 2 T sesame oil + 2 T (add right before finish)
  • 1/2 tsp sesame seeds
  • 1/8 tsp black pepper
  • 2

    Soak dried shitake mushrooms in warm water. Fully immerse mushrooms in water by adding weight on top. This will help reconstitute mushrooms quicker.

2 hrs) until the meat is fully tender. Best way to check the tenderness is to tear a little piece off and taste.

I am holding up this piece of Galbi with tongs after simmering for 90 min. You can see that it’s not falling off which means it still has another 20

Now just break off fat pieces and discard them. You can easily remove fat from Galbijjim or any other stew or meat stock using this method without a lot of fuss.